OPEN PAID POSITIONS FOR FALL 2019

 

The Kingsman is looking to fill several paid positions for the Fall 2019 semester. Interested parties must be registered as a matriculated undergraduate student at Brooklyn College for the upcoming semester, and ideally, for the Spring 2020 semester as well. All interested parties should reach out to us over e-mail at KingsmanBC@gmail.com; or send an e-mail to our current editor-in-chief Quiara Vasquez at quiara@zoho.com.

 

BUSINESS MANAGER ($60 per issue) – The business manager keeps track of printing expenses, stipends, and other costs incurred over the course of the semester, making sure The Kingsman does not go over budget. In addition, the Business Manager is the conduit through which advertisers communicate with The Kingsman.

 

SPORTS EDITOR ($70 per issue) – The sports editor oversees sports coverage, with a focus on on-campus events. They are responsible for turning in an article every week, and delegating assignments to other writers interested in covering sports.

 

ADDITIONAL POSITIONS ($?? per issue) – As you may know, The Kingsman is currently pursuing a merger with its fellow campus paper, Excelsior. Should we do this, our budget would nearly double with printing expenses staying the same. This means we would be able to create several new paid positions: for instance, a dedicated arts or features editor, or a person in charge of photography, or a weekly columnist. If you have a skill or talent you think The Kingsman could use, please contact us!

 

IMG-8571Read the articles below or click here for the PDF version: FINAL – KINGSMANSPRING2019ISSUE10

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OPEN PAID POSITIONS FOR FALL 2019

The Kingsman is looking to fill several paid positions for the Fall 2019 semester. Interested parties must be registered as a matriculated undergraduate student at Brooklyn College for the upcoming semester, and ideally, for the Spring 2020 semester as well. All interested parties should reach out to us over e-mail at KingsmanBC@gmail.com; or send an e-mail to our current editor-in-chief Quiara Vasquez at quiara@zoho.com.

BUSINESS MANAGER ($60 per issue) – The business manager keeps track of printing expenses, stipends, and other costs incurred over the course of the semester, making sure The Kingsman does not go over budget. In addition, the Business Manager is the conduit through which advertisers communicate with The Kingsman.

SPORTS EDITOR ($70 per issue) – The sports editor oversees sports coverage, with a focus on on-campus events. They are responsible for turning in an article every week, and delegating assignments to other writers interested in covering sports.

ADDITIONAL POSITIONS ($?? per issue) – As you may know, The Kingsman is currently pursuing a merger with its fellow campus paper, Excelsior. Should we do this, our budget would nearly double with printing expenses staying the same. This means we would be able to create several new paid positions: for instance, a dedicated arts or features editor, or a person in charge of photography, or a weekly columnist. If you have a skill or talent you think The Kingsman could use, please contact us!


New York Passes State Budget With Key Reforms

By Allison Rapp, Digital Editor

After weeks of back and forth, the New York State Legislature and Gov. Andrew Cuomo have finally agreed on a new $175 billion budget for the state. The passing of the new budget is a major win for state Democrats, as the Senate was under Republican control for the past several years.

“This is probably the broadest, most sweeping state plan that we have done,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday afternoon after signing off on the budget. “There are a number of national firsts and it really grapples with the tough issues that have been facing this state for a long time.”

Some of those national firsts will create considerably progressive changes in the lives of New Yorkers. A state-wide ban on plastic shopping bags will be put in place, along with millions of dollars for clean water projects and the Environmental Protection Fund. Another budget boost will be given to schools, with education spending gaining an extra billion dollars, which is a 3.8% increase from last year.

Another major aspect of the new budget is the passing of congestion pricing, which many CUNY students have spent the last several months pushing for. Congestion pricing will place a toll on all drivers entering Manhattan below 60th St., and the revenue created by the tolls will be put towards city MTA renovations.

Criminal justice reform is also included in the new state budget, with the elimination of cash bail for most non-violent crimes and misdemeanors, though not all of them. In addition, the budget includes funding for the Jose Peralta DREAM act, which aids undocumented students in receiving scholarships and state financial aid.

“The entire CUNY community takes great pride in the contributions of the late Senator Jose R. Peralta, a Queens College graduate and one of the earliest and most eloquent champions of New York’s DREAM Act,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor, Vita C. Rabinowitz, in a statement. “We thank Governor Cuomo and the state legislature and its leaders for their commitment to the thousands of undocumented Americans pursuing their dreams at CUNY.” ​

This new state budget, though wide reaching, has a few things missing, such as legalized marijuana, and the proposal to raise the state smoking age to 21.

“This was not an easy one. It was a hard one. But the hard ones are the good ones, by definition,” Cuomo said. “This is the best budget that has been produced since I’ve been governor.”

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


Homelessness, Hunger High Among CUNY Students

By Allison Rapp, Digital Editor

The Hope Center at Temple University in Philadelphia has released the results of CUNY’s annual “#RealCollege survey,”, in which the “basic needs” of students from all 19 CUNY colleges are evaluated.

The study, which polled nearly 22,000 CUNY students, showed 48% of respondents were food insecure in the prior 30 days,  55% of respondents were housing insecure in the previous year,  and 14% of respondents were homeless in the previous year.

Food security was defined in the report as being “the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe food, or the ability to acquire such food in a socially acceptable manner.”

Sara Goldrick-Rab, one of the founding directors of the Hope Center, and one of the co-authors of the report, told the Daily News that these numbers should serve as an alarm bell.

“This is devastating to these students. It’s a very serious situation,” she said, “nNot having enough to eat in college, or dropping out because you can’t pay your rent, can create a lifelong cycle where you are trying to get out of poverty and can’t do it.”

The Hope Center’s report agrees.

“Food and housing insecurity undermines academic success.  Housing insecurity and homelessness have a particularly strong, statistically significant relationship with college completion rates, persistence, and credit attainment,” reads the introduction. “Researchers also associate basic needs insecurity with self-reports of poor physical health, symptoms of depression, and higher perceived stress.”

Daniel Frazer is the higher education case manager for Brooklyn College. His role deals directly with crisis intervention in regards to situations like hunger and homelessness and he also assists students enrolling in city programs like SNAP (food stamps) and Medicaid.

“The students I serve are diverse and have issues that range from homelessness to food insecurity. Last year, I provided services to about 800 students and the amount continues to rise,” Frazer said. “My work directly addresses the rising number of food insecure, homeless and otherwise affected students through rapid on campus access to many city services and the ability to cut through some of the cities’ bureaucracy and provide timely access to services so many BC students need.”

Frazer believes that while there is an issue at hand, all hope is not lost.

“I don’t know what solution [sic] on a grander scale but I think we’re on the right track,” he said. “I hope to see, in the near future, expanded access to the services I provide as I know, while I see many, there’s still so many more students who’d benefit from case management services to address the issues of hunger and homelessness.”

Speaking once again to the Daily News, CUNY spokesman Frank Sobrino noted that the situation has been, and will be taken seriously by the university system.

“Rigorous, respected research by CUNY’s Urban Food Policy Institute found that the University’s aggressive efforts have helped cut food insecurity among its students almost in half,” he said. “CUNY is taking active measures to connect tens of thousands more students to life-changing resources that will contribute to their physical and mental well-being and academic success.”

For students interested in receiving assistance, e-mail Daniel Frazer at Daniel.Frazer28@brooklyn.cuny.edu to set up an appointment.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


Latina Life Stories with Cherrie Moraga

By Natalina Zieman, Staff Writer

On Wednesday, Apr. 3, author Cherrie Moraga shared her story, and her newest piece of work Native Country of the Heart, a memoir.

She described the book as taking a lot of time to put together and, not only pouring feelings and observations into it, a process because she did not know what was going to be a relationship with her mother, who suffered from Alzheimer’s. Moraga explained what life was like growing up queer and Latina. She discussed her closeness with her brother, admiring him and trying to be more like a boy. In snippets she read of her book, she mentioned moments with her older brother.

“There was a photo, a candid shot, I’m probably about four years old and I’m sitting on my brother’s lap. We’re watching TV. My sister at one end of the couch, James and I are coupled at the other. The length of each of my bare legs straddles his bathrobe clad thighs. The inner shadowy quality of the black and white mid-fifties photo gives me the impression of night time before bed,” she read.

Moraga wenton to explain that this photo showed un-self-conscious contentment in the children. She shared her memories with her family, and explained them, both in her book and in her presentation, that it felt like we were there right with her growing up in the 1950s and 1960s.

Moraga talked about her mom’s struggle with Alzheimer’s, and her lack of resistance towards her daughter who she knew was queer. What she was hinting at, was that her mother may have minded her daughter’s sexuality, but did not make an effort to rid her from her life. In another couple pages from the book, Moraga mentioned a moment when she had to “act like a man” and show the side of herself that she learned from her older brother.

“‘Mom?’ I try. She spins around and her look chills me. I’m in her way, that’s all she knows. An obstacle to the home, the bed, the familiarity which even the face of her youngest daughter could not provide… Suddenly it comes to me, a seduction of sorts. I feel myself literally growing into the compassionate husband, the devoted eldest son, all the missing men in her life, the ones I knew she would submit to. If only to be relieved once and for all, her burden of her own control. I feel myself more man than ever before.”

Moraga mentioned she “learned how to be a boy” from her older brother, when growing up. This moment she mentioned with her mother proved her masculine side. When answering questions during the event, Moraga said that her inspiration for her latest book was “the loss of the sense of the impending loss of my mother. And even though she was physically present, the look in her eyes… you know.”

Then she went on to explain the importance that her mother had recognized her and called her “mija,” or daughter, during her final days; although the mother would mistake her and say ‘tia’ (aunt). A strong relationship between mothers and daughters can never be broken, and Moraga so wonderfully presented that idea when speaking about her latest book.

Her sexuality may have dented their bond, but she stuck around until the end.

Cherrie Moraga is not only an advocate for the  LGBTQ community, but also for feminism, which she only briefly talked about.

“All that you can be, is because you had history,” Moraga said, when a student asked her about feminism back then compared to now. Love who you are, and what you stand for, then get inspired.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


Opinion: The Middle Generation

How kids born between 1997 and 1999 are lost in today’s culture

By Ryan Schwach, Managing Editor

Millennials, a term that has lost all of its meaning and is tossed around in the same fashion words like “literally” whose meanings have been warped into futility to the point it really doesn’t matter if you use them correctly anymore.

It i’s well documented at this point that the titles we give generations of babies born in a certain time are completely made up, you can throw it in with the numerous other things chalked choked up to being a social construct.

The trend of using generations to note spans of time rather than each time a family has a new offspring regardless of birth year happened sometime in the mid-20th century among European intellectuals, in what turns out to be a rather interesting anthropological history lesson which I know you probably don’t care to hear nor do I care to explain. In any event, naming generations became a way to group people under certain defining characteristics, for instance Millennials are lazy while Baby Boomers have a good hard work ethic, or Gen X had a rebellious bent and The Greatest Generation was thoroughly patriotic.

Of course, all of these mean nothing, in the same way there is no statistical fact to say I, having been born in February would have a hard time being friends with someone born in July because of something to do with the stars. There were lazy baby boomers and conservative members of Gen X, there is no rule of law to any of this.

However, the generational divides do act as a way to study the political and social climates each group of people were raised under. The Greatest Generation was raised in the Great Depression and fought in WW2, so the argument could be made that that generation as a whole was given the values of determination and overcoming adversity due to the world they lived in, where Millennials have lived mostly in years of economic upturn, and never had to deal with a war in which swaths of the population were drafted to fight overseas into an overseas war, giving them an entirely different cultural upbringing. Of course, these statements paint the generations with a wide brush and there are most likely millions of exceptions to these rules, but nevertheless they can be studied in a broad sense.

This brings up my main point, the categories are far from perfect, and things are missed, and certain years of people slip through the holes in the fence, specifically the years 1997,1998, and 1999. This generation (My Generation) is often at a loss when associating itself with either Millennials (Traditionally noted as being born between the mid 70s and mid 90s) or Gen Z (Mid 90s to around 2012).

The distinguishing factor between Gen Z and Millennials is an obvious one: Technology.  Traditionally Millennials are characterized as enjoying the fruits of the tech boom, obsessed with screens, but remember what it was like in the dark ages pre-world wide web. Gen Z however are characterized as having been born with an iPhone 3 in their hands, and “Learned to swipe before they could walk.” Although, our years in question, let’s call them the “Middle Generation,” because they barely share any of these traits, and this is why we have hard time claiming belonging to either category.

We were born in the formative years of the tech boom, the internet was young, and we were still nearly a decade away from getting the first true touch-screen phone. Going by the generational categories, we are supposed to be grouped with Gen Z, but if Gen Z is classified as being born into prosperous technology, it’s hard for us to fit in. We have clear memories of the days before the rapid connectivity of today, we remember the days before iPhones, and we remember the age before social media, yet we are always thought of as having been born with these things. My first phone was a flip, I didn’t have social media until I was 13, I remember how amazed I was when I found out how many songs an iPpod could hold, and I remember when Netflix was just a DVD delivery service. I often compare that to my kid sister, born in 2006, smack in the middle of Gen Z. Her first phone was an Apple, she just skipped the ipod, she had Instagram before puberty, and God forbid we ever explained to her the point of a Blockbuster. My  point is, how can we be the same generation? There are just too many cultural differences there because of the technological renaissance that occurred in my childhood, and the same reasons exist in why we can’t be Millennials either.

Millennials have clear memory of the 90s, the youngest born were five at the turn of the century, and even those have memories of the age before the internet became the most important tool in the history of humanity. Although, go back a few years and the difference between those born in 1990 and 1998 are numerous. Forgetting that Millennials go back into the 70s, there are enough differences between me and someone born in 1990. While I merely remember a non-interconnected world, they were truly raised in it, they have memories of the days before cell phones, let alone one you could call smart. The point being the cultural differences there are just as common, so how could we be Millennials? Basically, do I remember payphones? Yes, did I ever use one? Nope.

I think what makes this particular case a case at all is because of the tech boom that has defined the past thirty years. It happened quick enough and spread quick enough that the culture changed over a matter of a few years that those of us born in the middle can’t connect with a generation born into it, or a generation who remembers a world without any of it.

The thing is, we really don’t want to. Millennials have gotten the stereotype of being lazy and entitled, born into a world that made them believe they were special. Of course, just a stereotype, but not one we want to be associated with. We definitely do not want to be grouped in the screen-dependent generation of our younger, that only knows a soulless world of clickbait and social media influencers.

So, we are lost in the middle, not really belonging to either of the generations that people tend to associate us with. The best suggestion I could propose is that we forget about these stupid generational things all together, but as long as cable news and market research exist that is not going to happen, but, we could at least stop trying to think it means anything.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


The Latinx Art Show

By Hernan Pacas and Allison Rapp, Staff Writer & Digital Editor

The third annual Latinx Art Show drew a considerable crowd in the Student Center last Thursday evening. Hosted collectively by the Puerto Rican Alliance (PRA), the Mexican Heritage Student Association (MeHSA), and the Dominican Student Movement (MEDo), the event was lively with club activity.

“It’s amazing working with the other student clubs. MEDo and PRA have always welcomed MeHSA with open arms and it’s really amazing the connections we have because we’re always supporting each other!” said Litzi Martinez, President of  MeHSA. This was her very first time handling the organization of the Latinx Art Show. “Since we’re so close it’s very easy to get things done and communicate efficiently.”

In one room, a gallery of student artwork was displayed, featuring pieces by members of all three clubs. Students demonstrated their multitude of skills in painting, photo editing, drawing, and even woven art, and many advertised their availability to do commissioned work.

“Art is pure expression, it is a vibe, the way you live life, it is a way to deliver a lesson or express something interior,” said Flo Magica, one of the students presenting their artwork, who also challenged visitors to a short drawing puzzle. The prize? One of his very own prints in portable postcard size.

Next door, an entourage of performers entertained the guests with poetry readings, dances, music, singing, and everything in between. Magica recited original poems, including several written in Spanish.

“Each year it gets bigger and better and I can’t wait for what this event will look like a couple years from now,” said Martinez, who was happy with how the event turned out. “For next year I really hope we are able to establish a way that artists could possibly sell their artwork. Apart from that I just hope that each year the event keeps growing and the campus community becomes closer because of it!”

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


MoMA PS1 Explores the Subjugation and Resiliency of Women with Nancy Spero

By Jack Coleman, Staff Writer

The latest exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art PS1, “Nancy Spero: Paper Mirror,” opened on Sunday, Mar. 31.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Nancy Spero (1926-2009) was a leading figure in feminist art. In 1972, Spero founded A.I.R. Gallery, the first art venue in the United States run by and featuring only women artists. In the most far-reaching retrospective of the artist’s work since her death in 2009, the show encompasses her earliest work from the 1950s to her last piece, created in 2007. Curated and organized by Julie Ault, this show was done in conjunction with the Museo de Tamayo in Mexico City.

Organized in a breathtaking overview of Spero’s different phases, the exhibition includes over one hundred works which ponder oppression, maternity, the gendered violence of war, and the resiliency and vitality of women. Also featured is Brooklyn College Professor Irene Sosa’s video documentation of the artist at work.

Upon entering the third floor gallery at PS1, viewers are inundated by Spero’s meditations on women’s history. Most of these works are hand-printed on large and small scale paper panels, but there are also smaller works done in oil on canvas.

Spero’s Black Paintings from the 1950s and early 60s are gloomy oil paintings with gestural brushstrokes and barely discernible, hollowed human forms. The figures here are one with the abstraction, not laid over. Her activism and art begin to blend most audaciously at the onset of the Vietnam War with her War Series, where the brutality of the conflict is reflected in male and female forms. In keeping with her highly politicized subject matter, the Artaud Series of the 1970s focuses on the french poet Antonin Artaud’s language of “cruelty”, which Spero uses to express her status as a female artist in a male dominated art world. By looking at war, history, and literature in gendered terms, Spero lays the foundation for her later works which almost exclusively tackle issues such as gendered violence and inequality.

The subject matter and form of the early phases congregate into her large scale works Torture of Women and Notes in Time on Women, which is on view from the MoMA’s collection for the first time in a decade. The multi-panel friezes, made of taped pieces of paper, feature female figures prancing, jumping, and running freely amidst harrowing news stories, passages of literature, and historical documents. The selected text (featuring numerous Artaud passages) in the work is a sort of overview of the history of women, and contrasts with the liberated nude figures bouncing around the pages.

Her last installation piece, Maypole: Take No Prisoners, is situated in the basement of the museum, but can be seen by a balcony on the first floor. A polemic on the war in Iraq, Maypole calls attention to the atrocities of international conflict. Where handprinted heads on aluminum plates are attached to ribbons and seem to dangle from a large central pole, viewers are able to walk underneath and get a closer look at the grotesque faces as they are suspended overhead by wire. Though the bulk of her oeuvre is done on paper and often takes the form of scrolls or friezes, her idiosyncratic handprinting and treatment of politicized violence is still present in this massive piece.

In between the panels which tower to the ceiling, and those but a hair away from the floor, the works are scattered about the walls of the gallery in a seemingly chaotic way. This exhibition style, however, does not foil but flows with the work shown. Spero’s focus on the feminine realm is presented to the viewer in compositions which read more like documents than completed works of art, but shown in this magnitude and with Ault’s design genius, the life of each piece is brought forth in an unforgettable journey through Spero’s reimagining of history, or herstory.

“Nancy Spero: Paper Mirror” runs until June 23. CUNY students are granted free admission to MoMA PS1 and other cultural centers thanks to the CUNY Arts Program.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


Going Overground: Mimi Lien’s “Superterranean” at City Tech

By Quiara Vasquez, Editor-In-Chief

There was a running joke among the stage crew at my old theater that went a little something like this: “a prop is something that gets in the way during scene changes.” “An actor is a prop that won’t shut the fuck up.” Mimi Lien shared my childhood fascination with these massive structures; unlike me, however, Lien’s made a career out of reproducing them on stage. Now, with a MacArthur “Genius Grant” and a Tony under her belt for her scenic design for shows like “Natasha, Pierre, and The Great Comet of 1812,” Lien’s turning her attention to an even greater institution: CUNY City Tech.

Lien’s latest piece, a performance work called “Superterranean,” was unveiled to the public at City Tech’s Voorhees Theater on Sunday, Apr. 7. The work was done in collaboration with Pig Iron Theatre Company and City Tech’s Theaterworks program, which lets CUNY students interested in theater tech and related fields work with professional artists.

Lien came up with the idea for “Subterranean” when Pig Iron’s artistic director, Dan Rothenberg, asked her about her biggest obsessions.

“I guess a lot of my obsessions are spaces that have some kind of extremeness to them,” Lien told the audience. The extreme heights of cathedrals, for instance, or tunnels. Even the New Jersey Turnpike, which Lien admitted is “an eyesore for some,” is a source of fascination for Lien.

Lien and Rothenberg assured the audience that they were watching not a play, but the first two acts of a four-part performance piece.

“There’s no narrative to this,” Rothenberg said. “You can think of this as a sort of dream.”

The lights dim, and we open on a pair of square cells stuck together like a domino, one black and one white. Soon figures emerge from the two cubes. On the right, hazmat humanoids lumber about in the hissing darkness of the black cube. Meanwhile, a cherub-faced off-brand Stay-Puft marshmallow mannequin demurely deflates itself into a sea of white plastic off to the left. It whimpers, pleads to leave its cellophane prison, to no avail. The hazmat people walk on by.

There’s no dialogue, no real narrative, and next to nothing in terms of acting – and yet it’s totally riveting theater in spite of that, or perhaps because of that. Lien’s worked in plenty of materials and spaces over the past decade, but the thing that unites all of her work is the skill with which she entices an audience into the artificial world of the stage. In this case, the simplicity of the set is at once earnestly child-like and wildly open to interpretation on some symbolic level.

As she told me afterwards, Lien likes to keep it vague.

“I wasn’t thinking, what am I gonna make?” Lien said. She and members of the Pig Iron Theatre Company collaborated, hashing out ideas. Initially the actors focused on contrasting “soft bodies” with “hard bodies,” but hard bodies turned out to be less fertile ground than they first thought. After all, Lien explained, architecture is almost all made up of hard bodies.

Between rehearsals, Lien and the Pig Iron crew went to some of the inhuman spaces that fascinate her so for inspiration.

“In an early version, I took the company on a field trip to a wastewater treatment facility in Philadelphia,” Lien told me. “There’s this feeling of this whole system of infrastructure that’s hidden, and it’s something that wasn’t designed for human inhabitation, but we can’t live without it.”

This inspired the second act of the show, where a company of human actors huddle around a giant prism full of square orifices. The gurgling tower alternately recalls a watertower, a glory hole, and (even worse) a DMV. Soon the humans are joined by even softer bodies – a giant black esophagus monster, and a veiny white serpent which can only be described as “scrotal.” But Lien doesn’t think you should be alarmed by these plastic flesh snakes.

“Being human is really just being a sack of skin,” Lien told me.

Lien’s vision of “Superterranean” is only halfway realized. Between the first two acts, the space grows more spacious – from the claustrophobic diptych to a large enclosed space surrounding a pillar. In part three and four, Lien says, the space will only get vaster. As for how she intends to pull that off… well, that would be a spoiler.

“Subterranean” will have its formal premiere at the Philadelphia Fringe Festival this September.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


Softball Team Drops Two to CSI

By Maruful Hossain, Sports Editor

The Brooklyn College women’s softball team got dominated through two games and were held to zero base runners in one of them by the College of Staten Island Dolphins this past weekend. CSI took game one 18-0, and closed out the second game 11-0. The Bulldogs drop to 2-12 for the season after its first CUNYAC double header.

In game one, the Dolphins scored six runs in the bottom of the first inning and added two more in the second. The Dolphins then lso exploded with 10 runs in the fourth inning. They dominated BC with 18 hits on 34 at bats. The Bulldogs infielder/pitcher Anna Curran and first baseman Melanie Garate each went one for two in the game. Freshman pitcher, Megan Ortiz-Mengedoht had 10 earned runs and pitched four innings.The Bulldogs were held to only two hits.

Game two told the same story as the Dolphins dominated again in five innings, and CSI pitcher Jacklyn Kateridge threw a perfect game in the process. The Dolphins held a 3-0 lead throughout the majority of game two, and the Bulldogs still weren’t able to find answers as the Dolphins ran the lead up to eight runs in the fourth inning. Curran had seven earned runs and she pitched three innings. The Dolphins had 11 runs on 14 hits while the Bulldogs had zero runs on zero hits.

The Bulldogs look to shake off that loss as they next face Hunter College at home on Thursday, Apr. 11 at 3:00 p.m.

This article was originally published on 4/10/19 in Spring 2019 Issue 10.


 

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